5 Pros and Cons of Getting an Online Degree

Pros and Cons of Getting an Online Degree

Online schools have been gaining popularity in recent years. They are more convenient and flexible, and a lot less expensive. The phenomenon of Internet education is constantly evolving. Even the most respectable schools with stellar reputation are now offering courses online. Of course, such progressive type of education is not without its disadvantages, and you should evaluate all the pros and cons before committing to something. Fortunately, we are here to help you out!

Pros of Online Schools

  • Flexible hours. Many people who opt for online education already have careers or families and simply can’t dedicate a set amount of time to studying every day. This is why the deadline based online courses work so well.
  • Commute free. If you don’t live on campus, there’s probably spend much time on commuting. Well, with online schools the only thing that you’ll need to access your classroom is a laptop. Not only is it quicker and more efficient, you’ll also be able to communicate with interesting people from all over without ever leaving your home!
  • Ultimate accessibility. Online schools can be accessed by everyone. Whether you are wheelchair bound, live in a very remote location or simply want to attend an American University without ever leaving your country, it is now possible.
  • A wide range of majors. Many traditional schools can only offer degrees in a certain number of subjects. With online programs, this is no longer a concern. You can study anything from criminal justice to nursing to medieval history.
  • Skills of the future. While studying in an online program, you’ll have to use your computer to create presentations and use a wide variety of media. These skills are now highly appreciated in the workplace and will definitely look good on your resume.

Cons of Online Schools

  • Limited interaction with an instructor. One thing many people complain about when it comes to online classrooms is the lack of personal touch with professors. If individual interaction is important to you, you might want to consider other options.
  • Technology requirements. Despite the ubiquitousness of modern technology, not all people have powerful laptops or 24/7 Internet connectivity.
  • The social factor. Young people crave the “campus experience” with its parties, clubs, and lifelong friends that Internet schools simply cannot provide.
  • Stigma. While Internet education is becoming more widespread every year, some people still think that it is less prestigious and effective than that received in traditional schools. There might come a time when you might lose a job opportunity because your degree is not “real” enough.
  • Financial aid. Most online schools do not offer any kind of financial aid, so if you have scholarship opportunities, it might be a good idea to reconsider.

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